Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Morristown, Arizona, United States
    Posts
    3,300

    Default Do Radar Jammers Really Work?

    WHAM TV
    7/5/2005

    Kristen Miranda (Rochester, NY) 07/05/05 - A radar jammer that's being advertised locally is different from a regular radar detector. For one thing, it promises to make cars "invisible” to police.

    The manufacturers are so convinced it works that if you do get a ticket, they say they'll pay for it.

    If state trooper Erich Koenig wants to catch someone speeding there are several ways he can go about it.

    He said, "You can get them from in front, behind, moving, or stationary."

    Troopers have various tools at his disposal, such as a laser.

    Koenig said, “When I look in the scope, there's a red dot. I place that on the front license plate and pull the trigger."

    They also utilize regular radar. Koenig said by the time anyone hears a beep, he’s already got their speed recorded and it’s too late.

    But radar jammers claim to confuse a laser (or radar signal) and to be able to detect police before they see you. Most protect from the front only.

    http://www.wokr13.tv/news/local/stor...5-255C269DC42E
    RadarBusters.com
    Motorcycle Mounts and Accessories
    Also Join me at -
    Twitter: RadarRoy
    Facebook: Roy Reyer

  2. #2
    Experienced
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Budapest, HU
    Posts
    255

    Default

    I have no experience with radar jammers but I know that radar scramblers are really work. They're making much returns for RMR (but nothing else).

  3. #3
    Professional
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    928

    Default

    I like the fact that he says they can just estimate the speed and it would hold up in court..



    I think I would take a book into court and drop it from 5' in the air and ask the officer to guess the speed of it as it is falling.
    I bet he can not even get close to the speed.

  4. #4
    Good Citizen
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    143

    Default

    Eh watching a book drop and looking at a car travel toward you for several seconds are very different.

    They are trained to be within 5mph, and the best are very accurate.. but it still shouldn't (and doesn't in MD) hold up in court. Human error could result in someone being unfairly nailed.

  5. #5
    Scratonicity Groupie
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    7,614

    Default

    haha, it would make my day to get at ticket with the reason calibrated eye. I mean how can you prove his eye was not tired, maybe the glare was putting alot of stress on it. Did his radio go off and distract him for one second, I think I could go on forever. Was the smell of the donut and hazlenut coffee making his mind wonder. Where his glasses / contacts the correct perscription that day can you prove that? wow, what a joke.

    Please give me a ticket for calibrated eye that would be the funniest thing ever in the court of law.

    And no I belive in the book theory. If there eye is so calibrated it should be able to judge the distance of anything. Hell, I'll use a feather that way it doesnt hurt the courts pretty little floors

    --staton

  6. #6
    Yoda of Radar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    In front of my computer
    Posts
    10,773

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boomerman
    I like the fact that he says they can just estimate the speed and it would hold up in court..



    I think I would take a book into court and drop it from 5' in the air and ask the officer to guess the speed of it as it is falling.
    I bet he can not even get close to the speed.
    What are you saying? Completely obvious what the speed is. 9 4/5 metres per second per second is the acceleration, of objects falling on Earth in a vacuum (it does go down slightly as you increase altitude, but this is only important when you are going on the Moon or somethign) and a book dropping in the atmosphere of a courtroom should accelerate at a predictable 9.8m/s^2 (reasonably close) every time.

    Two metres (6 2/3 feet) from the ground, when it hits the ground it should be travelling at about 6 1/4 m/s, which is 22 1/2 km/h or about 13 4/5 miles per hour. (sorry I think in metric...).

  7. #7
    Yoda of Radar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    In front of my computer
    Posts
    10,773

    Default

    Just make sure he uses his calibrated eye and not the calibrated brain...

  8. #8
    Professional
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    928

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmaartAasSaabr
    Quote Originally Posted by boomerman
    I like the fact that he says they can just estimate the speed and it would hold up in court..



    I think I would take a book into court and drop it from 5' in the air and ask the officer to guess the speed of it as it is falling.
    I bet he can not even get close to the speed.
    What are you saying? Completely obvious what the speed is. 9 4/5 metres per second per second is the acceleration, of objects falling on Earth in a vacuum (it does go down slightly as you increase altitude, but this is only important when you are going on the Moon or somethign) and a book dropping in the atmosphere of a courtroom should accelerate at a predictable 9.8m/s^2 (reasonably close) every time.

    Two metres (6 2/3 feet) from the ground, when it hits the ground it should be travelling at about 6 1/4 m/s, which is 22 1/2 km/h or about 13 4/5 miles per hour. (sorry I think in metric...).
    WOW..you do need to get another hobby!!

  9. #9
    Yoda of Radar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    In front of my computer
    Posts
    10,773

    Default

    No I had to learn all that in school... :?

  10. #10
    Professional
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Dallas/Lubbock, Texas
    Posts
    917

    Default

    I learned that acceleration business last year in school! Nice to know it was put to good use for something...

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. laser jammers really work
    By gtpjonny in forum Radar Detectors - General
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-29-2012, 07:38 PM
  2. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-17-2011, 05:21 PM
  3. How laser jammers work ?
    By BMW^Z4 in forum Laser Jammers - General
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 02-02-2007, 01:40 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •