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  1. #1
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    Default Virginia reasoning not reasonable

    But representatives of the Virginia State Police, the insurance industry and the Virginia Sheriffs Association spoke against the bill, arguing that it would make the highways more dangerous and drive up insurance rates by increasing the number of car crashes.

    State Police Capt. Steve Chumley said a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study showed people are more likely to speed if they have a radar detector.

    John Jones, executive director of the sheriff's organization, suggested the ban is a matter of common sense.

    I have to contact this (windbag) man, who is absolutely wrong, and let him know. This subject will be covered in my next book anyway, with Virginia justice shown full of hypocrisy. I got a ticket for having a radar detector, not for using it. A trooper hovered around my car looking inside and I had no idea why he was so interested in me. I then learned the actual Virginia law, which makes it illegal to have "access" to a radar detector, it doesn't matter if it's being used or not.

    He clearly searched my car to find it. I looked up his ticket history, and it was filled with fines for things such as sleeping, excessive vehicle length, improper tread depth on tires, improper lane change, improper driving, improper braking...and laws I don't understand how to avoid breaking, as I don't know what they all are. I believe he was originally after a black SUV that had sped past me and his checkpoint, not me, but traffic was so heavy that day, he had to pull out in front of people to get out, and nearly caused an accident doing so. I had out of state tags, and he needed somebody I guess, since he lost the speeder in heavy traffic. All I can figure.

    Now that I know the actual Virginia law, I'm using my detector more on the interstates. It's very important to know when your under surveillance in hot spots with over eager ticket writers. The detector itself is not actually illegal as the signs say, just being able to use it is. Spectra II and III indicates if one is on if nearby, and records show they've given out several tickets for radar detectors in certain areas with no other infractions involved, so they most likely have later Spectra detectors. Speeding tickets are far more damaging than detector tickets, which don't affect your insurance.

    So, if you've been popped, or near a police detector, turn off the detector, if in VA or D.C. If they start to pursue, take down your detector and tuck it away if you think they may hunting their Spectra signal. They are supposed to be obligated to prove your detector has access to power, and was able to detect signals, otherwise, it's not "illegal".

    Original point, did I get a radar detector to deliberately and intentionally speed? NO. They do have other purposes. That guy's "common sense" is BS. My first detector was before I had cruise control, I used it to double check my speed when being clocked, because even safe drivers can accidentally or and even need to speed on occasion for safety. I have no speeding tickets in 26 years of driving (20 with a detector), and have never been in an accident. The detectors I've had have helped save me from cops hiding at the bottoms of a hills or in a sudden speed change zone, why we often call them traps.

    I wrote complaint letters to every public office in VA, and undoubtedly cost the state more in admin than they ripped me for on that one ticket. I was severely offended because I wasn't speeding, and didn't even know I was doing anything illegal, not having read subsections of the actual law. Also, during my times in Virginia, I'd been a victim of crime more than any place I've ever been, and nothing was ever done in any case on my behalf. And without detectors the Richmond area drivers, who can't own them, still speed like crazy, and road rage is rampant. The state also ranks consistently high in fatal car accidents, and clearly they are not stopping speeders, accidents, or road ragers with this law.

    And a side note, which furthered my aggravation, a few miles outside of Richmond VA someone was dropping rocks one night off an interstate overpass and hit my car. I called police, and the dispatcher said it might take as long a twenty minutes for someone to arrive...if I wanted to wait. I had been on the road 7 1/2 hours and was 15 minutes from my destination, and very tired. The overpass was inaccessible from the interstate. I implored the dispatcher to send someone, because this was a serous hazard, that has caused fatal accidents in my home state, TN. They never sent anyone.

    Sure enough, when I got in Richmond, I heard on the news that a woman was in critical condition, intensive care, after an object being dropped from the exact same overpass struck her car, causing her to wreck. So forgive me if I find claims of "public safety" in VA as an excuse to do secret surveillance on me. Without a doubt, revenues are their first priority in my experience, and they don't want detectors possibly interfering in their fund raising.

  2. #2
    Good Citizen
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    Virginia
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    Default Re: Virginia reasoning not reasonable

    I have to contact this (windbag) man, who is absolutely wrong, and let him know.

    His number is 804-674-2000.

  3. #3
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    Default thanks anyway...

    Thanks, but that wouldn't do any good (direct contact). I got my ticket the same week Virginia state legislature was passing a law making it illegal for your underwear to show in public. The only thing that stopped them was CNN. The people in charge of Virginia law, who claim to be so concerned with our safety and well being, actually spent valuable time in legislature to pass a law against visible underwear. It would have passed too, as no one listened to common sense arguments on the floor. What affected their judgement to arrive at genuine "common sense" was public embarrassment from national media. They switched their votes and dropped the bill to pass that law, only after national news exposed their lunacy.

    Notice the people who protested the repeal of what is a hostile law to out of state drivers, from my perspective. They each seek to profit from the law as is. I believe VA legislature listens to these people disguised as safety advocates, who are really just lobbyist to protect fundraising interests. Insurance profits from tickets with no actual loss in claims. Hitting out of state drivers brings in revenue. I know two big hit areas in VA on 81. It's fairly obvious there's some sort of point system, because one day you can pass 10 cars pulled, and many times you can drive all the way in or out without a single pop. Of course they don't want you to "detect" that.

    The state has the same sort of mentality it had when it became the flash point for the civil war. The majority of the public wanted to end slavery, finding it immoral, but the government listened to the minority of slave owners, who made up the wealth of Virginia, and legislators served money interests before the public interests. Today, there's a road information sign on north 95 to Richmond. The sign was no doubt put up for public safety, but it was being used to tell drivers how to get to the Richmond raceway. There was no mention that traffic went to one lane due to construction ahead and was nearly stopped. That is a strong implication of the state's priorities IMO.

    This stuff may be common knowledge here, but Edmonds has a story that explains what their thinking probably is. I am in no way against anything that makes driving safer. It is always a scary thing making the commute from NC or TN to Richmond, because I almost always have a near miss from truckers, road ragers, or people just tuned out. Plus we all make mistakes, and I've been incredibly lucky in addition to taking a lot of care. But I would like to feel like troopers were protecting me, rather than being part of the challenge and stress of long commutes. My experience tells me first and foremost they're hunting prey, and secondarily protecting me as a side effect. I'm placed in a rare situation where I feel compelled to break a law, that otherwise violates civil rights if I follow it, and that is stressful too.

    (clip part from Edmonds.com editors) I hope the hyper links work here... full story link is
    http://aolsvc.edmunds.com/ownership/...3/article.html

    "If you really want to try to fight your ticket, read 'Beat the Cops' by Alex Carroll," Meyer said. "But you'll probably lose anyway."

    I ordered the book through Carroll's Web site http://www.cleandrivingrecord.com/ and read it. And for the first time since seeing those blue and white lights I felt a glimmer of hope. The book describes how the majority of tickets are issued to generate money for government municipalities. Insurance companies benefit from traffic tickets, too, raising your rates when your driving record shows a moving violation. The National Motorists Association http://www.nationalmotoristsassociation.com/ claims that costly radar guns are donated to police departments by some insurance carriers to encourage them to write more speeding tickets.
    "If you really want to try to fight your ticket, read 'Beat the Cops' by Alex Carroll," Meyer said. "But you'll probably lose anyway."

    (end clip from Edmonds.com editors)

    p.s. Thanks to Radar Roy and his supporters for a great website!

  4. #4
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    Default

    Virginia is not that bad. Virginia does not have Spectres yet and by the time they do I will have a Bel STI. Currently the only way you can get caught with a detector in VA is if they see it in your car, see brake lights from you if they hit you with instant on, or you have a crappy detector that the VG2 can pick up.

    In VA hide your detector and use it correctly you are better off in VA than any other state.

    Virginia has a lot of stupid driving/car laws, but it is SO EASY to not get caught in Virginia if you know what you're doing.

    I personally hope that VA NEVER gets rid of the detector ban. Let the lawmakers be ignorant and think they are making the state safer by banning them, it only works to our benifit.

    Another way the detector ban works to my benefit is that most people obey this silly law. This means no leaky Radio Shack and Cobra detectors in other cars to cause a false alert on your detector.

    So next time lawmakers or other officials ask the public their opinion on detectors, I will tell them to please keep dangerous driving off our roads by keeping the ban!

  5. #5
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    Default thanks

    I will hope you're right about the spectre, because you can't see my detector anymore when it's up, and I already figured out not to show a sudden response when clocked in that state. It's typically not even needed because I set my speed within the enforced speed limit 73 in a 65, so no need to suddenly brake. On the interstate, if they're not doing pop, they're usually not pulling anyone, as they let blatant speeders go right by otherwise, who didn't see the unmarked cars. If you're a speed demon on the road, with the intention to use a RD to secure constant speeding, you'll get tagged eventually. Excessively false security would probably help their fund raising efforts. My issues with Virginia are much deeper than the topic covers here. But thanks for the info.

 

 

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