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  1. #1
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    Default Where did the nickname "The Fuz" come from?

    I've always wondered why LEO's have had the nickname of "The Fuz"
    Can anyone shed some light on this?

  2. #2
    Yoda of Radar
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    Shaved heads?

  3. #3
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    http://www.straightdope.com/mailbag/mcop.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Straight Dope
    The origin of "fuzz" is uncertain. The expression arose in America in the late 1920s and early 1930s, probably in the criminal underworld. It never quite replaced cop.

    Evan Morris, The Word Detective, says:

    Where in the world are you hearing people refer to the police as "fuzz"? . . . I have never heard a real person use it, unless you want to count Jack Webb on the old "Dragnet." When I was growing up in the 1960s, we called police officers many things, but mostly we just called them "cops" and we never, ever, called them "the fuzz." As a matter of fact, anybody calling the cops "the fuzz" would have been instantly suspected of being a cop. It would have been a faux pas right up there with ironing your blue jeans.

    There are several theories about the origin of "fuzz":

    American Tramp and Underworld Slang, published in 1931, suggests that "fuzz" was derived from "fuss," meaning that the cops were "fussy" over trifles.
    A mispronunciation or mishearing of the warning "Feds!" (Federal agents). This seems unlikely.
    Etymologist Eric Partridge wonders if "fuzz" might have come from the beards of early police officers. This also seems improbable.
    The term is not related to Fuzzy Wuzzy who wuz a bear. (You didn't ask, but the term "bear" for police refers to the Smokey the Bear hat commonly worn by state troopers.)

    Evan Morris suggests the word "arose as a term of contempt for police based on the use of 'fuzz' or 'fuzzy' in other items of derogatory criminal slang of the period. To be 'fuzzy' was to be unmanly, incompetent and soft. How better to insult the police, after all, than to mock them as ineffectual?" That explanation seems as good as any, and better than most.

  4. #4
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    Jimbonzzz,
    Thank you.

    I am new to this forum and I must say your pictures of Mike and Roy are f'n Hilarious!! You must have a great sense of humor and I hope that stays with you as you grow older.

    I'm a longtime owner of the V1 and really enjoy reading everyones comments. Great Forum!!

 

 

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