Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Newcomer
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Havana/Tallahassee
    Posts
    2

    Default New cap and rotor messing up radar detector?

    I called whistler due to some weird detector beeping and lights, they asked if a put a new cap and rotor on, then I said wow. I put the old cap and rotor back on the problem went away. I went from an accell cap and rotor to another accel cap and rotor box number 8233, and then the problem started. So why does it screw it up also what would accel change that would now cause the problem. thanks. :!:

  2. #2
    Radar Fanatic
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Staffordshire, Uk
    Posts
    1,999

    Default

    you need to use a cap and rotor arm which is the same spec and make as the old one....

    if its a bosch replace it with the identical part.... you cant go wrong if it doesnt happen on the old cap and rotor!

  3. #3

  4. #4
    Good Citizen
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Most likely either the cap or rotor or both are incorrectly indexed with respect to their mount points. When this happens the air gap from rotor to cap terminals is greater and the longer arc puts out a wide spectrum of frequencies with greater power levels than before. This may set off you detector or cause some problems by being picked up in your power supply wires. Ionizing air like this puts out a spectrum of frequencies which is extremely wide. The first radio transmissions were done exactly this way.

    If the indexing is way off your car may also run like crap because the ignition will either fail to fire the proper plug and/or try to fire the next cylinder in the firing order. You should be able to spot the indexing difference, if any, visually by comparing your new cap/rotor to the old parts.

    This happens all the time when people pull the distributor and get it back in with the cap and rotor misaligned even if the timing with respect to the crank rotation is correct.

  5. #5
    Power User
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    4,150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ronsc1985
    Most likely either the cap or rotor or both are incorrectly indexed with respect to their mount points. When this happens the air gap from rotor to cap terminals is greater and the longer arc puts out a wide spectrum of frequencies with greater power levels than before. This may set off you detector or cause some problems by being picked up in your power supply wires. Ionizing air like this puts out a spectrum of frequencies which is extremely wide. The first radio transmissions were done exactly this way.

    If the indexing is way off your car may also run like crap because the ignition will either fail to fire the proper plug and/or try to fire the next cylinder in the firing order. You should be able to spot the indexing difference, if any, visually by comparing your new cap/rotor to the old parts.

    This happens all the time when people pull the distributor and get it back in with the cap and rotor misaligned even if the timing with respect to the crank rotation is correct.
    Just curious (kind of off topic) as you mentioned "misaligned", could that be responsible for predetenation, had a new F150 ran great but then seemingly after a service had a slight predet problem, you could hear the engine pinging away, though it happened seldomly and few times randomly, we just increased the octane, problem solved. Per suggested manual the V6 could use regular and it did well for 2 years, then that happened. Against my opinion my now wife had the spark plugs changed at that time, that alone gave its own problems, one cylinder was missing completely and was very noticable at times, even with a fresh swap again of all plugs things improved but. So then after that last service I personaly did platnum plugs, new wires (thinking that a wire was damaged from being pulled). But now what you brought up, dont know if the mechanics "touched" anything that could have resulted in this minor behavior.

  6. #6
    Radar Fanatic
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Staffordshire, Uk
    Posts
    1,999

    Default

    sound like it could cause pinking.........

    most dizzy caps have a bit on them which fits in the distributer, this then stops you from putting it on mislined,
    the vw gti which i use to have had a cap and rotor, and you could only set the timming on idle speed, this also had a knock sensor which advanced and retarded the ignition on the detection of pinking!

    my vr6 has 2 knock sensors 1 for each 3 cylinders!!

    it also depends on if its got a knock sensor and if it has then it will adjust the timming automaticly!

    using a hall sender inside the distributer! obviously distributers with breaker contacts dont have hall senders and theirfore cannot adjust the timming!

  7. #7
    Lead Foot
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Austin,TX
    Posts
    336

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amoney
    Quote Originally Posted by ronsc1985
    Most likely either the cap or rotor or both are incorrectly indexed with respect to their mount points. When this happens the air gap from rotor to cap terminals is greater and the longer arc puts out a wide spectrum of frequencies with greater power levels than before. This may set off you detector or cause some problems by being picked up in your power supply wires. Ionizing air like this puts out a spectrum of frequencies which is extremely wide. The first radio transmissions were done exactly this way.

    If the indexing is way off your car may also run like crap because the ignition will either fail to fire the proper plug and/or try to fire the next cylinder in the firing order. You should be able to spot the indexing difference, if any, visually by comparing your new cap/rotor to the old parts.

    This happens all the time when people pull the distributor and get it back in with the cap and rotor misaligned even if the timing with respect to the crank rotation is correct.
    Just curious (kind of off topic) as you mentioned "misaligned", could that be responsible for predetenation, had a new F150 ran great but then seemingly after a service had a slight predet problem, you could hear the engine pinging away, though it happened seldomly and few times randomly, we just increased the octane, problem solved. Per suggested manual the V6 could use regular and it did well for 2 years, then that happened. Against my opinion my now wife had the spark plugs changed at that time, that alone gave its own problems, one cylinder was missing completely and was very noticable at times, even with a fresh swap again of all plugs things improved but. So then after that last service I personaly did platnum plugs, new wires (thinking that a wire was damaged from being pulled). But now what you brought up, dont know if the mechanics "touched" anything that could have resulted in this minor behavior.
    I dont believe a misfiring/shorting plug wire would introduce detonation. Stumbling or general powerless, yes, but not pre-ignition. Platinum plugs are primarily used to increase plug life, and dont generally provide any increase in performance in a properly functioning ignition system (if the voltage is weak, it will mask this issue). Were the replacement plugs the correct heat index? A "hotter" plug can lead to increased combustion chamber temperatures and result in detonation (pinging). The increase in octane simply masked the problem by introducing a slower burn rate.


    Getting back to the issue, it surprises me that this sort of noise filtering isnt already present on the product. In fact in astounds me, that it would be absent on any product that is going to interface to an automotive electrical system. The cost and effort to implement onto the design is neglible.

  8. #8
    Good Citizen
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Actually misalignment of the rotor and cap won't cause detonation is the strictest sense but it can cause firing the next cylinder in line at the wrong time which sounds like detonation to a lot of people.

    What happens is the cylinder that is supposed to be firing is at the top of it's compression stroke. Higher pressure makes it more difficult ie. more voltage, to fire the plug. The next cylinder to fire is on its intake stroke at this time. The pressure in the cylinder is at atmospheric or lower making it easy to fire this plug. This cylinder also has a nice fresh air fuel charge and the intake valve may still be open. When you get a kaboom in this instance you also light up the air fuel charge in the intake manifold if there is any such as with throttle body injection or a carb. Normally when things are right the air gaps involved in the cap and the plugs are such that the proper cylinder fires. When things are misaligned the lowest voltage to break down the air gaps may be to the previous cylinder. Actually it could be to the next cylinder depending on how the cap and rotor are misaligned. This hardly ever happens since this cylinder is on its exhaust stroke and the cylinder pressure is high making it hard to fire that plug.

    BTW this is not idle speculation. I see it all the time at the race track where people constantly have things apart and are under extreme time pressure to get things back together, like between rounds at a drag race.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Gah i love messing with cops...
    By GreeKNastY in forum Valentine One
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10-19-2008, 06:14 PM
  2. LEO messing with me
    By Kevint in forum Valentine One
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-13-2008, 02:29 PM
  3. cell phones messing up V1
    By sachmo12345 in forum Valentine One
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-13-2005, 04:26 PM
  4. Friends & I messing with a stalker LZ1
    By sethy in forum Laser Jammers - General
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-21-2005, 11:26 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •