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  1. #1
    Radar Fanatic
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    Default police radios... how long before they go digital!!

    over here in the uk a few years ago they were testsing out new radios that were digital and the communication was encrypted!

    i had a uniden bearcat handheld scanner, i use to like lying in bed at 2 am listening to whats going on....

    but i sold it to my mate, the reason i was skint and needed money but also they were saying that with the police starting to use digital radios, when they all have them the scanners wont be of any use..
    because digital cant be picked up...
    i would get another one but with this in mind i dont see much point..

    is the usa heading towards digital radios..

  2. #2
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    it will be longer then we think. Think about almost like HDtv some people thought it took off and spent the extra money for an HD tv yet when there are only like 5 HD channels

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  3. #3
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    true.... this was a few years ago, i think they were having problems with it as bt ''british telecom'' was suppling the equipment.

    i've found this.....
    it seems like they are going ahead with this digital police radios over here... so scanners in the uk wont be much cop........

    http://www.thecourier.co.uk/output/2...y6716577t0.asp
    PUBLIC FEARS over the safety of the TETRA police communications system should not be dismissed and merit ongoing national investigation.

    However, as long as there are guaranteed operational benefits to the police and public from the new system, and only a potential risk to health, people should accept the new system until any firmer evidence emerges that it is a danger, Fife Constabulary said yesterday.

    In an exclusive interview with The Courier at Fife Police HQ in Glenrothes Chief Inspector Rennie Ritchie highlighted the advantages already experienced by police forces in England using the system which is set to be in use with Fife officers by Easter.

    Out will go the present system of antiquated analogue radios. In will come secure mobile digital radio terminals allowing fast transfer of information and images between patrolling officers and their stations.

    Benefits to officers will include secure communications, improved radio coverage and message clarity, satellite tracking and provision of a ‘panic button’ linked to central control in case of emergency.

    Served by 22 new masts already up and running in Fife as part of an almost complete national network, the Airwave service is the new digital radio communications network designed to meet the needs of the police and other public safety organisations in the 21st century.

    Airwave is a digital mobile radio service, developed and managed by mmO2 to provide a secure, powerful and flexible communications network.

    The contract to provide the Airwave service was awarded to mmO2 in February 2000 by the Police Information Technology Organisation, on behalf of the Home Office. The service is based on the European open standard TETRA (Terrestrial Trunked Radio).

    The network infrastructure for the service is being built, owned and operated by mmO2 under the Government’s Public Private Partnership.

    Later this year, the Government will withdraw the existing frequencies used by the emergency services in England and Wales, for their radio systems. The withdrawal of existing frequencies, north of the border will follow.

    Therefore emergency services will have to move to alternative systems before the frequencies are withdrawn.

    However, Airwave is not merely a replacement for the existing analogue systems it will potentially provide a range of new services. Mr Ritchie said Airwave has been designed to enable the police and public safety organisations to deliver a more effective service to the community. When development has finished there should be the potential for:

    * Access to local and national databases “from Kent to Kirkcaldy” leading to better and faster provision of information to officers.

    * Secure communications—analogue scanners operated by some criminals, will not be able to listen into police radio traffic.

    * Digital voice quality, improving clarity and reducing any possible misunderstandings.

    * One terminal acting as a radio, mobile telephone and data terminal.

    * Automatic vehicle and person location leading to quicker responses, more efficient use of resources and improved officer safety.

    * Comprehensive management information enabling the best management of limited operational resources.

    * Interoperability providing seamless voice, data and image communications, across the country and across organisational and geographical boundaries.

    Mr Ritchie said the network could lead to a secure, modern communications system linking the police, fire, ambulance and other services.

    The emergency services’ response to major incidents—such as Lockerbie or Hungerford was known to have been hampered by a lack of adequate communication. He said Airwave has been designed to eliminate such interoperability problems.

    Mr Ritchie said he was well aware of the furious debate about TETRA in north-east Fife and beyond. Most local councillors, although over-ruled by a central committee, said no more masts should have been erected until more is known about health issues.

    Nationally, Greens have highlighted the Trower Report, commissioned by the Police Federation in England, where TETRA is fully operational. This report, it is claimed, had found there was significant risk of headaches and migraines and a possible association with motor neurone disease. Residents near masts in England had also reported nose bleeds, nausea, headaches and other symptoms, while there have been reports of ill health from officers using handsets in Lancashire.

    The Greens have also said the Stewart Report issued by the Independent Expert Group on Mobile Phones recommended that emissions in the 16Hz range be avoided, as this frequency is known to be psycho-active. TETRA masts, they say, have been shown to pulse at 17.6Hz.

    Telecommunications structures must comply with International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection guidelines and further promulgated by the National Radiological Protection Board. Stressing he was no scientist, and would never knowingly endorse a system thought to be dangerous, and stating it might be impossible to ever prove the system completely safe or unsafe, Chief Inspector Ritchie said present official guidance to Fife Constabulary was that the system fell within these guidelines and this was accepted.

  4. #4
    Speed Demon
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    Digital is expensive! Alot of small towns/cities cant afford the upgrade. My city hasnt upgraded were at 100k citizens. I wish digital scanners would drop in price. Maybe in a acouple of years. :roll:

  5. #5
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    More and more systems are going digital, although it will be a gradual process.

    Here in the US, a lot of federal homeland security funds have been used to build better radio systems. Many of these systems are built with digital ready features, and over time as other parts need to be replaced, they will also gain digital capability.

    The state of Florida has 2 digital radio systems now. One I can currently monitor (digital but unencrypted) and the newer one I will not be able to monitor.

    Ed

  6. #6
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    NYC hasn't even gone trunked yet? and they have the money to go digital the radio techs will be over their heads forthe first year

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by edweird

    The state of Florida has 2 digital radio systems now. One I can currently monitor (digital but unencrypted) and the newer one I will not be able to monitor.

    Ed
    Just wait grasshopper! Im sure Uniden and RadioShack will have a scanner that will decode the new system.

  8. #8
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    Nope. The radio systems manufacturers (specifically MA/Com) have figured out how to prevent this.

    #1 Do not license the technology to others.

    #2 Withhold critical parts of info on the specifications and standards.

    Based on the legalities, they are covered under the prohibitions for breaking encryption rules.

    Now anyone who tries to market a product, reverse engineered or not, can be prosecuted for breaking the encryption.

    Previous trunked systems (Motorola, EDACS, LTR) were figured out either by licensing the use of the technology, reverse engineering, or figuring out another way to work with it based on the published info.

    Google "Provoice AND ESK" for more details.

    Ed

  9. #9
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    There are some cities here in the DFW metroplex that have gone digital. One is the airport. Most of them you can monitor. You just have to fork out the bucks for the scanner. I have scanner that is digital capable you just have to purchase the card. I have not done so though as I don't care to hear some of the cities that are digital.

    When I was in Ohio I looked up some cities and found some of them to be digital. Happy Ass went and bought him a digital scanner when he found out some of them were digital.

    OUTRUN

  10. #10
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    Right now most digital systems can be monitored. Some, like EDACS Pro-Voice cannot. But if your city goes to Pro-Voice, you can buy a Pro-Voice radio on e-bay.

    GTO_04

 

 

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