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unmamfqlm
12-08-2010, 09:40 PM
Why am I not surprised? If I had a dime for every computer issue that I've had this year, I'd be a wealthy man. Anyways, I can't get rid of the malware on my laptop, and need some guidance. I've ran my anti virus program and Spybot. What now?

My anti virus program popped up Win32.Malware-gen, if that helps at all.

yellowcab
12-08-2010, 09:48 PM
Malwarebytes. Worked for me. Trend, adware and spybot couldn't remove it

unmamfqlm
12-08-2010, 10:01 PM
Malwarebytes. Worked for me. Trend, adware and spybot couldn't remove it

That's what my friend recommended. If I download that, do I need to get rid of Spybot?

yellowcab
12-08-2010, 10:04 PM
No, but I don't run them in real time, just scans

Stealth Stalker
12-08-2010, 10:19 PM
It could be worse. You could have a Mac!

Good luck!

unmamfqlm
12-08-2010, 10:33 PM
Good god, that program found 69 infected objects on my laptop. Hopefully that program does the trick; I'm getting tired of my desktop.

Stealth Stalker
12-08-2010, 10:55 PM
You inspired me, so I'm running a malware scanner.

Halfway through, I already have 1 virus and 11 spywares.

Oh wait... Mac's don't get virus or malware. It must be mistaken.

v1user
12-08-2010, 10:57 PM
You inspired me, so I'm running a malware scanner.

Halfway through, I already have 1 virus and 11 spywares.

Oh wait... Mac's don't get virus or malware. It must be mistaken.

Which one are you running? I'm trying to run one too. Linky would be helpful so I can run it. I wonder how many spywarez and malware I have. I don't visit too many pron sites so it should be kind of low?

<<JAZZY>>
12-08-2010, 11:03 PM
I use Spyware Blaster, SUPERAntiSpyware, Spybot Search and Destroy, AVG Anti-Virus, Malwarebytes.

unmamfqlm
12-08-2010, 11:07 PM
You inspired me, so I'm running a malware scanner.

Halfway through, I already have 1 virus and 11 spywares.

Oh wait... Mac's don't get virus or malware. It must be mistaken.

What the hell is with you and Macs, lol?

Weeth
12-08-2010, 11:12 PM
You inspired me, so I'm running a malware scanner.

Halfway through, I already have 1 virus and 11 spywares.

Oh wait... Mac's don't get virus or malware. It must be mistaken.

Man, you really hate your computer :(

Once it's finished scanning, check the log and look up the threat through the antivirus program. Mine detected 10 a few days ago, but they were all files in a java cache that only affect windows.

Weeth
12-08-2010, 11:19 PM
Why am I not surprised? If I had a dime for every computer issue that I've had this year, I'd be a wealthy man. Anyways, I can't get rid of the malware on my laptop, and need some guidance. I've ran my anti virus program and Spybot. What now?

My anti virus program popped up Win32.Malware-gen, if that helps at all.

Sometimes, the virus programs will only identify the threats. Not delete them. This requires you to delete the files manually.

Did you search for the file or containing folder in the search part of the start menu? Did you find its containing folder?

If you do, DO NOT open it, but send the infected file to the recycle bin. (delete it) Select it then shift+delete on the file. But make sure you're not deleting an important stuff, like documents or system files. Once again, do not open it!

unmamfqlm
12-08-2010, 11:26 PM
Why am I not surprised? If I had a dime for every computer issue that I've had this year, I'd be a wealthy man. Anyways, I can't get rid of the malware on my laptop, and need some guidance. I've ran my anti virus program and Spybot. What now?

My anti virus program popped up Win32.Malware-gen, if that helps at all.

Sometimes, the virus programs will only identify the threats. Not delete them. This requires you to delete the files manually.

Did you search for the file or containing folder in the search part of the start menu? Did you find its containing folder?

If you do, DO NOT open it, but send the infected file to the recycle bin. (delete it) Select it then shift+delete on the file. But make sure you're not deleting an important stuff, like documents or system files. Once again, do not open it!

Actually, my antivirus program didn't even detect anything, nor did Spybot. I did search for it earlier, but I didn't do anything with it. After running the Malwarebytes program, it is no longer there, so I believe that did the trick.

Just out of curiosity, is Avast any count for a free anti virus program?

Weeth
12-08-2010, 11:36 PM
Why am I not surprised? If I had a dime for every computer issue that I've had this year, I'd be a wealthy man. Anyways, I can't get rid of the malware on my laptop, and need some guidance. I've ran my anti virus program and Spybot. What now?

My anti virus program popped up Win32.Malware-gen, if that helps at all.

Sometimes, the virus programs will only identify the threats. Not delete them. This requires you to delete the files manually.

Did you search for the file or containing folder in the search part of the start menu? Did you find its containing folder?

If you do, DO NOT open it, but send the infected file to the recycle bin. (delete it) Select it then shift+delete on the file. But make sure you're not deleting an important stuff, like documents or system files. Once again, do not open it!

Actually, my antivirus program didn't even detect anything, nor did Spybot. I did search for it earlier, but I didn't do anything with it. After running the Malwarebytes program, it is no longer there, so I believe that did the trick.

Just out of curiosity, is Avast any count for a free anti virus program?

I haven't used that particular program, so I can't advise you on it in particular. I have used Windows Essentials' virus/malware protection which seems to work fine. It's free also.

When I used PC's, I noticed that the more virus protection programs I had, the slower the computer was.

It's like walking through TSA airport security 4 times to board a flight. It really slows you down.

So I'd give windows essentials a try. But don't load your computer up with tons of different ones, cause it'll take forever to startup.

unmamfqlm
12-08-2010, 11:44 PM
I've always been told that one should never have more than one anti virus program installed? Perhaps, I was told to not let them all run at the same time, I don't remember. I just recall hearing that they will interfere with eachother, which could lead to bad things.

I will look into Windows Essentials, though. I have heard of it.

houdni
12-08-2010, 11:53 PM
webroot spy sweeper gets rid of mine...

Hunter
12-09-2010, 08:05 AM
webroot spy sweeper gets rid of mine...

I also use spy sweeper and it gets rid of all of mine.

supercowpowers
12-09-2010, 01:29 PM
Backup, format, reinstall. It's the only way to be sure. Security software is good for letting you know something is there, but you can never guarantee there's not more that it didn't detect, and the presence of any malware is indication the system was already compromised somehow.

Then again, I'm paranoid. How paranoid you want to be is a personal decision.

Sector_15504
12-09-2010, 01:51 PM
your best bet is to just start over, only sure way.

Sandman76
12-09-2010, 03:03 PM
I think the WIN32 virus can hibernate. I had it once and it was a PITA to get rid of. I went through a website that offers help for a donation. Basically I ended up running a scan, delete some crap, restart, use another program do another scan, delete something reboot etc etc. Took a while but it was worth it. I do believe the Win32 virus can also disable your antivirus and anti malware programs. I couldn't get SpyBot or Malwarebytes to run.

Weeth
12-09-2010, 03:14 PM
Reformatting's not a bad idea since you keep having trouble. Just make sure you do it correctly!

Stealth Stalker
12-09-2010, 04:00 PM
What the hell is with you and Macs, lol?
Good question! They just don't like me. They are the BMW of computers. Hitler used a Mac! :D

I'm using SOPHOS, which works with both Macs and PCs. This is the first time I've ever used it. Although it found a lot of crap, I still have a browser hijack going on, so it's not that great.

that guy
12-09-2010, 08:54 PM
could be worse, could have A.I.D.S.

unmamfqlm
12-09-2010, 09:07 PM
could be worse, could have A.I.D.S.

Very true, lol. I don't think there's an effective program to get rid of that one, unlike my situation.

Sui
01-13-2011, 08:50 PM
Good god, that program found 69 infected objects on my laptop. Hopefully that program does the trick; I'm getting tired of my desktop.

Be diligent about it. Run your anti viral/malware proggies at least once or twice a week. Malwarebytes is one of the best for that kinda thing - often their database gets updated several times daily.

Another one I could recommend is Eset Online Virus scanner. One of the best, and not only does it find viruses it cleans them out too. Totally free.

unmamfqlm
01-13-2011, 08:54 PM
Good god, that program found 69 infected objects on my laptop. Hopefully that program does the trick; I'm getting tired of my desktop.

Be diligent about it. Run your anti viral/malware proggies at least once or twice a week. Malwarebytes is one of the best for that kinda thing - often their database gets updated several times daily.

Another one I could recommend is Eset Online Virus scanner. One of the best, and not only does it find viruses it cleans them out too. Totally free.

Damn, I'm surprised to see this thread come back to life after more than a month. Anyhow, I've never heard of Eset. Do you think it's safer than Avast?

Sui
01-13-2011, 09:04 PM
Good god, that program found 69 infected objects on my laptop. Hopefully that program does the trick; I'm getting tired of my desktop.

Be diligent about it. Run your anti viral/malware proggies at least once or twice a week. Malwarebytes is one of the best for that kinda thing - often their database gets updated several times daily.

Another one I could recommend is Eset Online Virus scanner. One of the best, and not only does it find viruses it cleans them out too. Totally free.

Damn, I'm surprised to see this thread come back to life after more than a month. Anyhow, I've never heard of Eset. Do you think it's safer than Avast?

I am not a fan of any of the big name antiviral scanners to tell you the truth. They get updated far too little, and the "real time" protection generally works too well - that is to say all it really does very effectively is slow down your connectivity, and is general a pain in the arse with using VPN's, etc etc. The only real time protection I'd personally recommend is Windows Security Essentials - now while I am not that impressed with it (as I am not impressed with any other of the major realtime protectors), it also does not screw up one's connectivity.

Eset is a very safe online proggie. Not only does it do a good job, you don't have to permanently install anything on your computer - it will give you the option to uninstall after the scan/clean job is done. One thing I will recommend is using IE for this - it works best that way (one of the very few things I use IE for).

Using this with Malwarebytes is definitely a good 1-2 punch in virus/malware defense. And when you find something in Malwarebytes, be sure to always run the Eset scan right after.

I'd definitely bookmark it if I were you. PM me if you want the link.

Weeth
01-13-2011, 11:29 PM
Wow, this thread came back to life!

Did you ever try windows essentials security?

barryswanson
01-14-2011, 12:13 AM
I not long ago downloaded microsoft virus protection for my old HP laptop and it ran scans and picked up a few things and deleted them. Then when you go to a virus protection site and run the free scans it tell me that I have 50 or something odd viruses. I truly believe that those virus protection software companies make the viruses and bull **** you into thinking you have viruses to convince you to buy there product.

xyd
01-14-2011, 12:47 AM
I use firefox only, and while I have a virus scanner (Eset Smart Security) to take care of CSS injections etc, I get zero malware/spyware/whatever.

Sui
01-14-2011, 01:22 AM
I use firefox only, and while I have a virus scanner (Eset Smart Security) to take care of CSS injections etc, I get zero malware/spyware/whatever.

Same reason I use Firefox - IE is a malware magnet and a half.

Bottom line is NO single piece of software is going to catch everything - kinda like radar detectors, ironically. I personally use a hardware firewall, software firewall, anti malware and antivirus. I can't think of the last time I had any kind of infection. But I find tons of crap on other people's computers that I am cleaning out, in some cases malware/spyware infections numbering in the THOUSANDS... it's amazing some of these computers still worked at all.

Weeth
01-14-2011, 01:26 AM
I use firefox only, and while I have a virus scanner (Eset Smart Security) to take care of CSS injections etc, I get zero malware/spyware/whatever.

Same reason I use Firefox - IE is a malware magnet and a half.

Bottom line is NO single piece of software is going to catch everything - kinda like radar detectors, ironically. I personally use a hardware firewall, software firewall, anti malware and antivirus. I can't think of the last time I had any kind of infection. But I find tons of crap on other people's computers that I am cleaning out, in some cases malware/spyware infections numbering in the THOUSANDS... it's amazing some of these computers still worked at all.

I use a mac...

LOL, don't want to go down that road.

I agree. I've had nothing but trouble with IE. In addition to the malware issues, it's extremely slow.

Sui
01-14-2011, 01:38 AM
I use firefox only, and while I have a virus scanner (Eset Smart Security) to take care of CSS injections etc, I get zero malware/spyware/whatever.

Same reason I use Firefox - IE is a malware magnet and a half.

Bottom line is NO single piece of software is going to catch everything - kinda like radar detectors, ironically. I personally use a hardware firewall, software firewall, anti malware and antivirus. I can't think of the last time I had any kind of infection. But I find tons of crap on other people's computers that I am cleaning out, in some cases malware/spyware infections numbering in the THOUSANDS... it's amazing some of these computers still worked at all.

I use a mac...

LOL, don't want to go down that road.

I agree. I've had nothing but trouble with IE. In addition to the malware issues, it's extremely slow.

I use both Mac's and PC's. Both platforms have their uses, but Mac's are a bit less problematic with the viruses and so forth, albeit not infallible. Mostly build my own PC's - definitely not a beleiver in department store desktops.

supercowpowers
01-14-2011, 06:56 AM
But I find tons of crap on other people's computers that I am cleaning out, in some cases malware/spyware infections numbering in the THOUSANDS... it's amazing some of these computers still worked at all.


I not long ago downloaded microsoft virus protection for my old HP laptop and it ran scans and picked up a few things and deleted them. Then when you go to a virus protection site and run the free scans it tell me that I have 50 or something odd viruses. I truly believe that those virus protection software companies make the viruses and bull **** you into thinking you have viruses to convince you to buy there product.

Do security programs still count a tracking cookie as one instance of spyware?

Sui
01-14-2011, 11:22 AM
^ Yup, for the most part they do.

supercowpowers
01-14-2011, 11:48 AM
^ Yup, for the most part they do.

Well then. For anyone that doesn't know, that doesn't necessarily mean there are 50-1000 processes running on your computer stealing your information and hosting child porn. It just means that there are 50-1000 cookie files that can be used to track your browsing habits for marketing purposes. It's creepy, but they don't hurt your computer. I avoid the issue entirely by setting my browser to never save any information.

Sui
01-14-2011, 12:54 PM
^ Yup, for the most part they do.

Well then. For anyone that doesn't know, that doesn't necessarily mean there are 50-1000 processes running on your computer stealing your information and hosting child porn. It just means that there are 50-1000 cookie files that can be used to track your browsing habits for marketing purposes. It's creepy, but they don't hurt your computer. I avoid the issue entirely by setting my browser to never save any information.

You're right.

However, Finding 500-1000 infections and close to 100 processes running on a XP SP3 box is murderous. I see this ALL the time. Ideally XP should only be running in the neighborhood of around 40-45 processes, or 50-60 processes on Vista/7. Doubling the processes doesn't seem like much numerically but it creates one helluva mess. A lot of memory helps but ultimately you want a fast responsive machine - no level of memory is going to make a difference when you have a constant CPU load of 50&#37; or higher. Ask the guy that has this level of infection and it takes him 10 minutes just to open his email client.

If you can live with all the tracking cookies on your machine - that's all fine and good, but the problem is the potential result is always there for things like getting a ton of spam you don't want.

The bottom line is tracking cookies still suck up resources on your machine, albeit it very little - this isn't a problem if you have just a few, but when you have hundreds or thousands of these on your machine it can and will effect the machine's performance adversely.

unmamfqlm
01-14-2011, 01:20 PM
Good god, that program found 69 infected objects on my laptop. Hopefully that program does the trick; I'm getting tired of my desktop.

Be diligent about it. Run your anti viral/malware proggies at least once or twice a week. Malwarebytes is one of the best for that kinda thing - often their database gets updated several times daily.

Another one I could recommend is Eset Online Virus scanner. One of the best, and not only does it find viruses it cleans them out too. Totally free.

Damn, I'm surprised to see this thread come back to life after more than a month. Anyhow, I've never heard of Eset. Do you think it's safer than Avast?

I am not a fan of any of the big name antiviral scanners to tell you the truth. They get updated far too little, and the "real time" protection generally works too well - that is to say all it really does very effectively is slow down your connectivity, and is general a pain in the arse with using VPN's, etc etc. The only real time protection I'd personally recommend is Windows Security Essentials - now while I am not that impressed with it (as I am not impressed with any other of the major realtime protectors), it also does not screw up one's connectivity.

Eset is a very safe online proggie. Not only does it do a good job, you don't have to permanently install anything on your computer - it will give you the option to uninstall after the scan/clean job is done. One thing I will recommend is using IE for this - it works best that way (one of the very few things I use IE for).

Using this with Malwarebytes is definitely a good 1-2 punch in virus/malware defense. And when you find something in Malwarebytes, be sure to always run the Eset scan right after.

I'd definitely bookmark it if I were you. PM me if you want the link.

Thanks for the info my friend. I will definitely check into that program.

lostidentity
01-14-2011, 08:23 PM
Now that your computer is supposedly clean, lay off the porn for awhile.

Sui
01-14-2011, 08:40 PM
Now that your computer is supposedly clean, lay off the porn for awhile.

If it's on a computer, it's pr0n....:D

unmamfqlm
01-15-2011, 02:25 PM
Now that your computer is supposedly clean, lay off the porn for awhile.

Those late and lonely nights get to me.

NETWizz
01-16-2011, 01:47 AM
As it has been said, to fully clean a malware infection it is safest to format and do a clean install of Windows. Only then can you be certain you are no longer infected.

Prevention:
1. Keep Windows Up-To-Date
2. Use AntiVirus such as Microsoft Security Essentials or Nod32
3. Google Chrome or Firefox is safer than Internet Explorer... Firefox is more familiar than Chrome for most users, but it is #2 for being targeted for adware/spyware

4. Avoid downloading toolbars, screensavers, and software from unscrupulous sources.
4. Avoid porn & warez ;-)

Sui
01-16-2011, 02:18 AM
As it has been said, to fully clean a malware infection it is safest to format and do a clean install of Windows. Only then can you be certain you are no longer infected.

Prevention:
1. Keep Windows Up-To-Date
2. Use AntiVirus such as Microsoft Security Essentials or Nod32
3. Google Chrome or Firefox is safer than Internet Explorer... Firefox is more familiar than Chrome for most users, but it is #2 for being targeted for adware/spyware

4. Avoid downloading toolbars, screensavers, and software from unscrupulous sources.
4. Avoid porn & warez ;-)

Formatting is the only guaranteed way to completely rid any computer of an infection, absolutely. It's also very time consuming. So it's best to concentrate on not getting infected in the first place.

You left out one critical element of prevention - if you don't know who the email is from, especially if it has an attachment, OR if it it is from someone you know but it looks fishy in any way shape or form, then DON'T open it. Just don't do it.

Norton is a f***pig. Total POS. All it does is slow your computer and connectivity down. Every time I come across a computer that can't get connected to the internet there's a 90&#37; chance the user has Norton installed, and half the time it's infected with scareware anyway, so that suite is a total waste of money - save your buckage and buy another RD. :D

You'd be much better off using the combination of a good standalone firewall and Windows Security Essentials.

Lastly, even if you have just one computer - do yourself a favor and run a router between the computer and the modem - you will be much safer behind a NAT and a SPI firewall. NEVER run direct to a modem, ever.

Weeth
01-16-2011, 02:23 AM
As it has been said, to fully clean a malware infection it is safest to format and do a clean install of Windows. Only then can you be certain you are no longer infected.

Prevention:
1. Keep Windows Up-To-Date
2. Use AntiVirus such as Microsoft Security Essentials or Nod32
3. Google Chrome or Firefox is safer than Internet Explorer... Firefox is more familiar than Chrome for most users, but it is #2 for being targeted for adware/spyware

4. Avoid downloading toolbars, screensavers, and software from unscrupulous sources.
4. Avoid porn & warez ;-)

Formatting is the only guaranteed way to completely rid any computer of an infection, absolutely. It's also very time consuming. So it's best to concentrate on not getting infected in the first place.

You left out one critical element of prevention - if you don't know who the email is from, especially if it has an attachment, OR if it it is from someone you know but it looks fishy in any way shape or form, then DON'T open it. Just don't do it.

Norton is a f***pig. Total POS. All it does is slow your computer and connectivity down. Every time I come across a computer that can't get connected to the internet there's a 90&#37; chance the user has Norton installed, and half the time it's infected with scareware anyway, so that suite is a total waste of money - save your buckage and buy another RD. :D

You'd be much better off using the combination of a good standalone firewall and Windows Security Essentials.


+1

YES! You cannot emphasize that enough! I need their toolbar like I need a hole in the head!

I fought with that program for years in my PC days.

All the money I've wasted on virus protection would have bought me a LI and a RD!

krypton2
01-16-2011, 04:51 PM
I very quickly looked through these posts so I apologize if any of this is redundant...but here's my tips:

1) Don't use any all-in-one anti-___ program...sure, they have their place and as time goes on the quality of the programs are getting better, but they're still not perfect. I'm not going to even mention which one I think is the best, solely because I don't want to promote them...they're all memory hogs. I've seen some of those all-in-ones that take up so much memory that you can't even do anything when they're running or your computer will freeze up for hours. You're better off using a separate firewall, anti-virus, and anti-malware that you can control entirely, in my opinion.
2a) Don't use IE for an internet browser unless you have to...I don't care what you choose to use, I would suggest Firefox or Chrome though if someone asked me.
2b) Don't rely on Microsoft anti-___ tools, while the Microsoft Security Essentials program might be sufficient it's not going to be as good as comparable software offered outside of your operating system.

Just because the virus/malware has been removed by a tool or anti-malware program doesn't mean it's totally gone. I call it disabling as opposed to removing...while the malware might be disabled from functioning, it might still actually be on your computer. Thus I suggest reformatting your hard drive as well...don't reformat over the current partition though, totally clear the hard drive and just start with a brand new partition if you can.

As far as anti-___ programs and tools go, here's my suggestions and reasons why:

Paid Anti-virus - ESET NOD32 - I've used this for years and it's very good in my opinion...it's a bit complex though with a lot of more advanced tools and options, so just keep that in mind. That being said, a lot of companies use ESET for their anti-virus needs so ESET does keep up on their software, offering frequent updates and changes to ensure that it's safe.
Free Anti-virus - Avira AntiVir - Avira is a direct competitor to Avast and I think both companies provide superb free antivirus tools...you will find that the ratings are comparable in almost every category when professionals compare the two tools. I personally prefer Avira because the anti-virus scans are very quick, but still scan in depth.
Paid Anti-malware - Webroot Spy Sweeper - I think Webroot has recently combined their Spy Sweeper program with an anti-virus to create an all-in-one tool...I still prefer the original Spy Sweeper though. One time many years ago I had a trojan horse on one of my computers and after research of over a dozen programs, found that Spy Sweeper was the only tool that could properly detect and quarantine it. I've been sold on the product ever since.
Free Anti-malware - Malwarebytes Anti-Malware - Simple but effective tool, it often rates very high in professional reviews. They also offer a paid version, but I've never tried it.
Firewall - ZoneAlarm Free Firewall - After many years I've found ZoneAlarm's firewall to be the best one out there for free, in fact it sometimes competes on review lists with paid firewalls too. It has enough options, but if you want the add-ons you have to pay for them. I'm a bit partial to it as I've only ever tried a limited number of free firewalls though.

I also have two other programs that I highly suggest...they aren't directly for anti-malware but I think they create a good combination with the above listed products. The first is Piriform CCleaner...this is a free tool that is very simple but very effective...it can remove all sorts of temporary internet files, cookies, and additional stuff you don't need on your computer and it can also clear registry errors. If you have never cleaned all of the junk from your computer before you will be amazed what it will remove...I frequently find it removing gigabytes worth of useless files from peoples' computers when they use it for the first time.

The second program is Sandboxie. A lot of people aren't aware of programs like these but they can eliminate virus issues by a large percentage. It's an easy to use program that allows you to operate many commonly used programs in a "sandbox", or a separate partition on your hard drive, which means that if you somehow get a virus while running it you just right click, disable programs in the sandbox, and then terminate the sandbox - the files that you opened are permanently removed from your computer. I use this almost exclusively for my Internet, email, and instant messengers...every time I receive a file (through downloading it on the internet, opening an attachment in an email, etc.) it opens through the sandbox and I can observe what it does...I can see every single file, regardless how little or big, that's in the sandbox, so if I download a file and it begins multiplying non-stop in the sandbox like a virus might, I can just disable and delete the sandbox and it's all gone - and it never even touched the registry or other important stuff in my computer.

That's about all I know...I don't work for any of these companies nor am I promoting them for any reason other than to help others...that's what I've had luck with in the past and hopefully it will help others, too. :) If you have any questions about any of it feel free to ask...

unmamfqlm
01-16-2011, 05:03 PM
I very quickly looked through these posts so I apologize if any of this is redundant...but here's my tips:

1) Don't use any all-in-one anti-___ program...sure, they have their place and as time goes on the quality of the programs are getting better, but they're still not perfect. I'm not going to even mention which one I think is the best, solely because I don't want to promote them...they're all memory hogs. I've seen some of those all-in-ones that take up so much memory that you can't even do anything when they're running or your computer will freeze up for hours. You're better off using a separate firewall, anti-virus, and anti-malware that you can control entirely, in my opinion.
2a) Don't use IE for an internet browser unless you have to...I don't care what you choose to use, I would suggest Firefox or Chrome though if someone asked me.
2b) Don't rely on Microsoft anti-___ tools, while the Microsoft Security Essentials program might be sufficient it's not going to be as good as comparable software offered outside of your operating system.

Just because the virus/malware has been removed by a tool or anti-malware program doesn't mean it's totally gone. I call it disabling as opposed to removing...while the malware might be disabled from functioning, it might still actually be on your computer. Thus I suggest reformatting your hard drive as well...don't reformat over the current partition though, totally clear the hard drive and just start with a brand new partition if you can.

As far as anti-___ programs and tools go, here's my suggestions and reasons why:

Paid Anti-virus - ESET NOD32 - I've used this for years and it's very good in my opinion...it's a bit complex though with a lot of more advanced tools and options, so just keep that in mind. That being said, a lot of companies use ESET for their anti-virus needs so ESET does keep up on their software, offering frequent updates and changes to ensure that it's safe.
Free Anti-virus - Avira AntiVir - Avira is a direct competitor to Avast and I think both companies provide superb free antivirus tools...you will find that the ratings are comparable in almost every category when professionals compare the two tools. I personally prefer Avira because the anti-virus scans are very quick, but still scan in depth.
Paid Anti-malware - Webroot Spy Sweeper - I think Webroot has recently combined their Spy Sweeper program with an anti-virus to create an all-in-one tool...I still prefer the original Spy Sweeper though. One time many years ago I had a trojan horse on one of my computers and after research of over a dozen programs, found that Spy Sweeper was the only tool that could properly detect and quarantine it. I've been sold on the product ever since.
Free Anti-malware - Malwarebytes Anti-Malware - Simple but effective tool, it often rates very high in professional reviews. They also offer a paid version, but I've never tried it.
Firewall - ZoneAlarm Free Firewall - After many years I've found ZoneAlarm's firewall to be the best one out there for free, in fact it sometimes competes on review lists with paid firewalls too. It has enough options, but if you want the add-ons you have to pay for them. I'm a bit partial to it as I've only ever tried a limited number of free firewalls though.

I also have two other programs that I highly suggest...they aren't directly for anti-malware but I think they create a good combination with the above listed products. The first is Piriform CCleaner...this is a free tool that is very simple but very effective...it can remove all sorts of temporary internet files, cookies, and additional stuff you don't need on your computer and it can also clear registry errors. If you have never cleaned all of the junk from your computer before you will be amazed what it will remove...I frequently find it removing gigabytes worth of useless files from peoples' computers when they use it for the first time.

The second program is Sandboxie. A lot of people aren't aware of programs like these but they can eliminate virus issues by a large percentage. It's an easy to use program that allows you to operate many commonly used programs in a "sandbox", or a separate partition on your hard drive, which means that if you somehow get a virus while running it you just right click, disable programs in the sandbox, and then terminate the sandbox - the files that you opened are permanently removed from your computer. I use this almost exclusively for my Internet, email, and instant messengers...every time I receive a file (through downloading it on the internet, opening an attachment in an email, etc.) it opens through the sandbox and I can observe what it does...I can see every single file, regardless how little or big, that's in the sandbox, so if I download a file and it begins multiplying non-stop in the sandbox like a virus might, I can just disable and delete the sandbox and it's all gone - and it never even touched the registry or other important stuff in my computer.

That's about all I know...I don't work for any of these companies nor am I promoting them for any reason other than to help others...that's what I've had luck with in the past and hopefully it will help others, too. :) If you have any questions about any of it feel free to ask...

Thanks a lot for the info.

NETWizz
01-16-2011, 05:30 PM
While I know Sandboxie can sandbox many pieces of malware and help protect Internet Explorer, you are generally much better upgrading to the latest version via Windows Update & not using it for anything but Windows/Microsoft Update (Windows XP and older). Really, Firefox or Google Chrome is where it is at for browsing the web. Occasionally (especially at work) you will still need Internet Explorer for specific web applications that use ActiveX; furthermore, IE is configure-able via Group Policy, but this is not applicable to home computers.

Somebody provided a great list of AntiVirus products. In my opinion, you may as well use Microsoft Security Essentials if you want a free AntiVirus product because it is supported by Microsoft & available via Windows Update. It is probably roughly as good as AVG, Avast, Avira AntiVir... At least with the Microsoft version though, it is tested and supported by the same vendor that makes your Operating System, so it should be trouble-free. Stay away from Symantec is right... it is worse every year in my opinion. The corporate version Symantec End-Point Protection (SEP) is junk, too.

Anti Malware: I recommend using the Windows Defender for no other reason than it is free, updated via Windows Update & included with Vista and later. Additionally, it is supported by Microsoft.

Great programs for cleanup of infections (hopefully on somebody else's PC i.e. your relatives):
Spybot Search & Destory
Malwarebytes Anti-Malware
HiJackThis (you need to know what you are doing to use it)
Autoruns


Backup:
Everything important should be backed up using the 3-2-1 rule.

3) Copies of anything important. I.e. The original version on your computer counts as 1 of 3.
2) Two types of backup media should be used. i.e. USB Hard Drive & DVDs or DVDs & Online... Use more than one backup medium.
1) One of your backups must be stored off-site be it your other home, your workplace, or even your car's glove-box.


Imaging:
Imaging is easier than re-formatting assuming you actually have an image of your computer though.
Tools that do this: Ghost, Acronis True Image, Partimage, Clonezilla, Zenworks Image Engine, Microsoft's ImageX...
You can use whatever you want just keep in mind there are two types of images file-based & sector based. Sector-based are typically faster & you do not have to prepare your hard drive first, but you cannot edit/mount your image, inject drivers, read files, etc. from the image file. You also cannot image a sector based image to a smaller hard drive than the original & if you image to a larger drive the partition(s) does/do not fill the entire drive.

krypton2
01-16-2011, 07:48 PM
While I know Sandboxie can sandbox many pieces of malware and help protect Internet Explorer, you are generally much better upgrading to the latest version via Windows Update & not using it for anything but Windows/Microsoft Update (Windows XP and older). Really, Firefox or Google Chrome is where it is at for browsing the web. Occasionally (especially at work) you will still need Internet Explorer for specific web applications that use ActiveX; furthermore, IE is configure-able via Group Policy, but this is not applicable to home computers.

Somebody provided a great list of AntiVirus products. In my opinion, you may as well use Microsoft Security Essentials if you want a free AntiVirus product because it is supported by Microsoft & available via Windows Update. It is probably roughly as good as AVG, Avast, Avira AntiVir... At least with the Microsoft version though, it is tested and supported by the same vendor that makes your Operating System, so it should be trouble-free. Stay away from Symantec is right... it is worse every year in my opinion. The corporate version Symantec End-Point Protection (SEP) is junk, too.

I agree with using Firefox or Chrome as I indicated in my post. If you know what you're doing, Sandboxie can help a ton though.

It's totally up to the consumer but I do not promote security options offered by Microsoft at all. There is one main reason and many smaller reasons - the main reason is lack of updates. Microsoft is known for their "Update Tuesday" and as far as I know this should be true for their security tools also...while smaller updates might come at other times, you will likely find that the major software updates/upgrades will come on Tuesday when Microsoft updates every other program they run. And that's not really efficient for security needs...if there's a major issue on Wednesday, you should get an update for it on Thursday or Friday, not 6 days later when they decide to launch all of their other updates, too.

I don't know for sure if that's how Microsoft updates their security software but based on about 20 other Microsoft programs I've ever used, I would imagine it's true. I have little against Microsoft itself, just their software updating procedure doesn't always have security in mind.

Sui
01-17-2011, 01:16 AM
CCCleaner is a handy tool. I definitely endorse it for doing the "crap cleaning" (as it implies :) )

I think the only real difference between Malwarebytes free and the paid version is it works in real time instead of having to be run manually.

Windows Security Essentials is ok for what it is, but it's also not an all in one program as it does not have a firewall. One reason why it's more wieldy then a lot of real time suites. This suite also has one other major advantage - it is almost universally approved by vendors and webmasters who require a security suite for remote accessing of their secure sites.

Zonealarm is one of the best firewalls out there, but often it works a little TOO well. Fortunately one can setup rules to allow access to things that need the access - such as other machines in your network. Even Zonealarm Free is configurable this way which is cool. If you want to use Cisco VPN though, ZA can be very problematic.

One should not solely depend on a software firewall. I can't stress this enough. Use a router with NAT and SPI in conjunction with a firewall or a dedicated hardware firewall. Redundancy rules when it comes to firewalls.

ALL of the all in one suites are a total waste of money - I don't care who makes it. Some of them are good but the problem is they wreck performance. None of them update anywhere near frequently enough. If you must use one, then I'd also recommend the ESET suite. Their ESET Online Scanner free service is also quite good and actually does more than just confirm you're infected - it will clean them out. Only free antivirus I'd recommend, period.

Windows defender usually updates a couple of times a week, which is more than I can say for their OS's. It's ok, but I wouldn't rely on it solely, as I wouldn't rely on Security Essentials on its own.

Spybot isn't that great anymore and it's also become a bit of a memory hog and insistent on running in the background. Malwarebytes pretty much owns it these days and uses up far less resources doing what it does.

X1000 on IE. Best to only use it when one absolutely has to. It's worthless securitywise and otherwise. You couldn't pay me to use it, no matter what countermeasures are offered to help "protect" it. That browser is just a turd.

Backup - there's only one rule there - one can't be redundant enough when it comes to backups.

And as far as completely removing infections - there is another method to doing it - manually. HijackThis makes this easier to deal with but as has been mentioned you need to know what you're doing to use it. Definitely not for an inexperienced user who doesn't know much, if anything, about editing their registries.

One final thought here: ALWAYS do your cleaning in safe mode, no matter what.

upstatedoc
01-22-2011, 02:38 PM
^^^Quick question, how do I get piriform ccleaner to stop deleting IE history? I tried unchecking the box for history but it still erased it?

Popeye77
01-22-2011, 03:27 PM
I've always been told that one should never have more than one anti virus program installed? Perhaps, I was told to not let them all run at the same time, I don't remember. I just recall hearing that they will interfere with eachother, which could lead to bad things.

I will look into Windows Essentials, though. I have heard of it.

True from experience. I run AVG tried Norton and couple of others,way too slow

krypton2
01-22-2011, 10:30 PM
^^^Quick question, how do I get piriform ccleaner to stop deleting IE history? I tried unchecking the box for history but it still erased it?

Run the scan (with the history box checked/included) and once it's done, uncheck the IE History box and run the scan again. It should be a real quick scan and find all of the same stuff, except the IE history. Then have it clean the files that were found (which should exclude the IE history) and see if that works.

Sui
01-22-2011, 10:55 PM
^^^Quick question, how do I get piriform ccleaner to stop deleting IE history? I tried unchecking the box for history but it still erased it?

Run the scan (with the history box checked/included) and once it's done, uncheck the IE History box and run the scan again. It should be a real quick scan and find all of the same stuff, except the IE history. Then have it clean the files that were found (which should exclude the IE history) and see if that works.

I think he means he wants to keep his history intact. I looked around and it seems that this problem is common between IE and CC Cleaner. Look at this thread:

http://forum.piriform.com
/index.php?showtopic=17053 (http://forum.piriform.com/index.php?showtopic=17053)

I've never had this problem using Firefox, and besides, you should consider going to Firefox or Chrome anyway. IE just sucks - at best it's a whack browser to begin with.

that guy
01-29-2011, 07:38 PM
Trojan removal can anyone help out with this one, my mom's comp has 14 trojans i managed to get two off using to Languys programs he told me about a while ago, any really good programs ya'll know?

Hunter
01-29-2011, 07:44 PM
I would reformat and reinstall windows for a new and clean system.This is why it is always important to make periodic back ups of your computer.You can try to remove them,but from my experience it never works,
After a clean system install..make sure you put Norton or a good anti virus program on.

that guy
01-29-2011, 08:20 PM
I would reformat and reinstall windows for a new and clean system.This is why it is always important to make periodic back ups of your computer.You can try to remove them,but from my experience it never works,
After a clean system install..make sure you put Norton or a good anti virus program on.
was hoping that wouldn't be the case, damnit

that guy
02-02-2011, 07:18 PM
I would reformat and reinstall windows for a new and clean system.This is why it is always important to make periodic back ups of your computer.You can try to remove them,but from my experience it never works,
After a clean system install..make sure you put Norton or a good anti virus program on.

did it runs like new again

upstatedoc
02-03-2011, 09:17 AM
IE just sucks - at best it's a whack browser to begin with.

Yeah I know, the wifey loves it though.

Sui
02-03-2011, 09:25 PM
IE just sucks - at best it's a whack browser to begin with.

Yeah I know, the wifey loves it though.

LOL, well. How can you argue with that? :) Just hope you have her on version 7, and not 8.

unmamfqlm
03-27-2011, 05:26 PM
This has nothing to do with malware, but this thread has had many different topics, so:

I recently switched to Firefox from Internet Explorer. I like it, and am wanting to keep it. Is there any possible way to uninstall Internet Explorer? I noticed that it wasn't listed in the "remove programs" sections of the control panel. After some research, I got some mixed up stories. Some say that it absolutely can't be uninstalled from a Windows system, while others have said that it could be. So, do I just have to leave the program on my system, or can I save some space, and uninstall it?

Also, is this a safe thing to do, or will it disable other things on my computer that are important?

kpatz
03-27-2011, 06:01 PM
Malwarebytes is my go-to for removing malware that has gotten into a system.

Another one I discovered recently is Combofix: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/anti-virus/combofix

What's neat about Combofix is it'll clean out all IE caches (there are several of them, and they can be a PITA to properly clean manually), temp folders, etc. It's a great way to disinfect and clean a system. AFAIK it's only for 32-bit systems, for 64-bit use Malwarebytes.